AZNPS

grants

Doug Green Research Grant

or

Miller/Saylor Grants

Publication or Research

FUNDING FOR HORACE MILLER/

GINNY SAYLOR GRANTS

Funding for publication and research grants is made possible by the generous gifts of members Horace Miller and Ginny Saylor. A total of $2,500 will be provided for funding both the publication and the research grants. The exact amount and proportions for the grants will be determined each year by the grant committee.

HORACE MILLER/GINNY SAYLOR

PUBLICATION GRANT

Background and Scope:

The Arizona Native Plant Society is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to promote knowledge, appreciation, conservation, and restoration of Arizona's native plants and their habitats. This grant is intended to assist with the costs of disseminating original work concerning the biology of Arizona native plants of the Southwestern United States and northern Mexico.
    One or more grants may be made each year. The deadline for submission of grant proposals is March 31, 2015.

Description and Purpose:

The Tucson Chapter of the Arizona Native Plant Society (AZNPS) provides funding for a limited number of grants to publication projects that focus on Arizona native plants and reach the broadest audience possible.
    Eligible publications or related publication projects must contribute to:
  • scientific knowledge of native plants
public understanding of native plants and their environments or native plant conservation.
    Applicants from all levels of experience are encouraged to participate (individuals, teachers, college and graduate students, professional researchers, etc.).
    Awards will be made for costs associated with: publication in a scientific journal; regional plant lists for general distribution; publication artwork; brochures or booklets for the general public; educational materials for schools; web page development; or other publication-related expenses as deemed appropriate by the AZNPS grant committee. Supplanting existing funding with this grant is not allowed.
    Applications will be judged on the basis of their consistency with the purposes and selection criteria described above.
    The grant recipient will be expected to make a presentation to the Tucson Chapter (or other AZNPS chapter), provide a short article for the AZNPS Plant Press, or make other arrangements for sharing their work with AZNPS.

Requirements:

  • Support by the AZNPS Horace Miller/Ginny Saylor Publication Grant should be acknowledged in any papers, reports, projects, and/or presentations. Example: Support provided in part by funding from the Arizona Native Plant Society Horace Miller/Ginny Saylor Grant program.

Due Date:

  • Complete proposals must be received by AZNPS-Tucson Chapter by 12:00 PM, March 31, 2015. Late proposals will not be considered. Download application here.

Submit proposals one of two ways:

  • Electronically in Microsoft Word or PDF form to Larry Norris. Subject line should include “Publication Grant.”
  • By mail to Publication Grant, AZNPS-Tucson Chapter, Box 41206, Sun Station, Tucson, AZ 85717.

DOUG GREEN RESEARCH GRANT

Background:

  • The Arizona Native Plant Society is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to promote knowledge, appreciation, conservation, and restoration of Arizona's native plants and their habitats.
  • Doug Green was a past president of the Phoenix chapter and a devoted member of the Arizona Native Plant Society for many years.  Doug was an enthusiastic advocate of our flora and volunteered many hours communicating to the public at schools, tabling events and other outreach functions to benefit AZNPS.  He was our good friend.
  • The research grant is intended to support the costs of active research in the biology of Arizona native plants.
  • The Phoenix Chapter will award in 2015 one research grant of $750 to an individual, group, or institution.
  • The deadline for submission of grant proposals is February 1, 2015.

Guidelines and Restrictions:

  • This grant is only for research of Arizona native plants, not exotic species or the relationship of exotics to native plants.
  • The grant may be used to fund the entire cost of a project or to supplement the cost of a project receiving other funding.
  • Researchers from all levels of experience are encouraged to participate including individuals, teachers on behalf of school children, college and graduate students, professional researchers, etc.
  • Members of the AZNPS are encouraged to participate but membership in AZNPS is not a requirement.
  • We encourage projects that include a citizen-science component.
  • The grant recipient will be expected to either make a presentation to the Phoenix Chapter (or other AZNPS chapter) on the results of the research, or provide a short article for the AZNPS Plant Press.
  • Funds are for research only and may not be used to attend conferences or symposia.
  • Support by the AZNPS Doug Green Research Grant should be acknowledged in any papers, reports, projects, and/or presentations. Example: Support provided in part by funding from the Arizona Native Plant Society Doug Green Grant program.

Due Date:

  • Complete proposals must be received by AZNPS-Phoenix Chapter by 12:00 PM, February 1, 2015.  Late proposals will not be considered. Download application here.

Submit proposal:

Electronically in Microsoft Word, RTF, or PDF form to Cass Blodgett. Subject line should include “Doug Green Research Grant.”

Previous Grants Awarded

Doug Green Research Grant:

   2014- Dustin Wolkis and Elizabeth Makings, Arizona State University, have been awarded $750. It will fund research on a critically imperiled plant in Arizona, Eryngium sparganophyllum Hemsl. (Arizona eryngo). E.sparganophyllum is a unique member of the Apiaceae family endemic to cienega type freshwater wetlands of Arizona, and northern Mexico. These rare ecosystems are under assault from habitat destruction and degradation, ground water pumping, recreation, overgrazing, and drought. They will investigate known populations of E. sparganophyllum, assess the combined population within Arizona's boundaries, investigate number of individuals, fecundity, and collect soil data. This research will lead to a conservation strategy for E. sparganophyllum.

GINNY SAYLOR RESEARCH GRANT

Background and Scope:

The Arizona Native Plant Society is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to promote knowledge, appreciation, conservation, and restoration of Arizona's native plants and their habitats. The research grant has been established through a generous bequest from long-time member Ginny Saylor. The research grant is intended to support the costs of active research in the biology of Arizona native plants of the Southwestern United States and northern Mexico.
  • The deadline for submission of grant proposals is March 31, 2015.

Description and Purpose:

  • Recognizing the importance of active research on Arizona’s native flora, the Tucson Chapter will award in 2015 one research grant to an individual, group, or institution to support research that enhances our understanding of native Arizona plants.
  • The grant may be used to fund the entire cost of a project or to supplement the cost of a project receiving other funding.
  • Only research involving native Arizona plants will be considered.
  • Researchers from all levels of experience are encouraged to participate (individuals, teachers on behalf of school children, college and graduate students, professional researchers, etc.).
  • Members of the AZNPS are encouraged to participate but membership in AZNPS is not a requirement.
  • We encourage projects that include a citizen-science component.
  • The grant recipient will be expected to either make a presentation to the Tucson Chapter (or other AZNPS chapter) on the results of the research, or provide a short article for the AZNPS Plant Press.

Restriction:

  • This grant is for research on native plants, not exotic species or the relationship of exotics to native plants.
  • Funds are for research only and may not be used to attend conferences or symposia.
  • Support by the AZNPS Tucson Saylor Research Grant should be acknowledged in any papers, reports, projects, and/or presentations. Example: Support provided in part by funding from the Arizona Native Plant Society Horace Miller/Ginny Saylor Grant program.
  • Supplanting existing funding with this grant is not allowed.

Due Date:

  • Complete proposals must be received by AZNPS-Tucson Chapter by 12:00 PM, March 31, 2015.  Late proposals will not be considered. Download application here.

Submit proposals one of two ways:

  • Electronically in Microsoft Word or PDF form to Larry Norris. Subject line should include “Publication Grant.”
  • By mail to Publication Grant, AZNPS-Tucson Chapter, Box 41206, Sun Station, Tucson, AZ 85717.

Previous Grants Awarded

Miller/Saylor Publication Grant:

  2014-Joshua Scholl of the University of Arizona has been awarded $500 for publication of his work entitled The Occurrence of Seed Heteromorphism in Arizona. Some plants produce multiple seed types simultaneously, and Josh’s goal is to summarize and better understand the reasons for this phenomenon.
    2013-A grant of $1,500 has been awarded to Frankie Coburn for his work on the Flora and Species-Environment Relationships along the Upper Verde River, Arizona. Mr. Coburn will be publishing a flora of the Upper Verde River, a little-studied area that is of great importance because of its use as a water source for the Phoenix metropolitan area.
   
    2012- Sarah De Groot of the Santa Ana Botanic Garden will be using her $1,000 to pay for the costs incurred by including color photographs in her new publication of the genus Eriastrum for the Flora of North America, a genus represented in Arizona by E. diffusum (miniature woollystar) and E. erimicum (desert woollystar). Sarah has written a provisional key for identification of the Eriastrums of Arizona which are in the Phlox Family. She is interested in feedback on how it works in the field. She would like to know if there are terms that are still confusing or unclear. Click here to download the key.
    2012- Linda Kennedy of the The National Audubon Society's Appleton-Whittell Research Ranch will use $500 to help with costs for the publication of a guidebook for native southwest plants that provide a food source for hummingbirds.
    2011- This year $1000 was awarded to Kirsten Lake, University of Arizona Herbarium, for the  preparation of illustrations for Legumes of Arizona: an Illustrated Flora and Reference.
    2010- Kristen Lake received $500  for funding to produce  botanical line drawings for the text Legumes of Arizona-An Illustrated Flora and Reference. This project was initiated by the Boyce Thompson Arboretum’s Desert Legume Program. The illustrations will be produced by the Art Institute of the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum. It is hoped that this information will be available to the public through a website.
    2010- John Wiens, Mark Dimmitt and Tom Van Devender received $500 to help with printing costs for A Vegetation and Flora of the Ironwood Forest National Monument. This study will then be available in herbaria and libraries for use by researchers and the public. The flora includes about 600 taxa in 82 families.
    2009- Dr. Dan Austin was awarded $600 for a field guide to Baboquivari Mountain plants, entitled An Identification, Ecological, and Ethnobotanical Primer. The guide will include 186 plants of the Baboquivari Mountain chain, with an appendix listing all the species known from the chain. This unique compilation includes common names in the local languages (including English, Spanish, O’odham, Yuman, Keresan, Tanoan, and Athapascan), species descriptions, ethnobotany, and ecological notes. The book is published by the University of Arizona Press.
     2009- Ana Lilia Reina-Guerrero received $400 for a Spanish translation of “Biodiversity of the Vascular Plants of Sonora, Mexico,” a chapter of the forthcoming book Bioidiversidad del Estado de Sonora. This book will enable Spanish-speaking researchers, teachers, and students to have the most accurate information available. It will encourage students in Sonora to continue botanical studies and support habitat conservation. The book is in press.

Ginny Saylor Research Grant:

  2014- Xing-Yue Monica Ge has been awarded a grant of $2,000 for her study Genomic Mechanism of returning to gynodioecy of Waterman Mountain Bursera microphylla. Her mating-system population study will provide evidence of the presence of hybridization in forming special populations with unusual sexual characteristics. Ms. Ge is a student at the University of Arizona.
Joshua Scholl’s project, An empirical analysis of bet-hedging in a seed heteromorphic plant native to Arizona, Pectocarya heterocarpa, will enhance knowledge of how plants cope with variable environments. Mr. Scholl is a University of Arizona student and his award was $500.
Tyna Yost of Arizona State University is working on a  project called Biological, ecological, and policy factors affecting the survival of Amsonia kearneyana, an endangered Arizona endemic. Her research will address both the biological and ecological aspects of an endangered plant as well as the legal and management issues governing its recovery. Ms. Yost received $365.
    2013-A grant of $2,000 was awarded to Anthony Baniaga to support his research on the Characterization and Natural History of the Selaginella arizonica x eremophila hybrid zone. Mr. Baniaga is using Selaginella to study aspects of how plants form new species.
    2012- No research grant given.
    2011- This year a grant of $500 was awarded to Kirstin Olmon, Northern Arizona University, for “A Flora of the Vascular Plants of the Upper Basin and Coconino Rim in Northern Arizona.”
     2010- A grant of $500 was awarded to Jamie C. Wolgast to support her research on the Vegetation and Flora of Aravaipa Canyon. She will focus her work on the rare plant communities within the canyon allowing land managers to assess the current status of the flora and adjust management strategies for conservation. The flora will eventually be available to the public.
     2009- The first grant of $500 was awarded to Christopher Kline, director of the Southwest Monarch Study, to help support a project to determine native plant composition of habitats occupied by reproducing monarch butterflies at three Arizona sites. The Southwest Monarch Study, formerly a research project of the Boyce Thompson Arboretum, has captured, tagged, and released wild Monarch butterflies (Danuas plexippus) in Arizona since August 2003.  The study relies on a large corps of volunteer citizen scientists.